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Lobster Diving

Lobster Diving

Catching your dinner can be exciting and challenging.  Like many places around the world, here in southern California, many scuba divers enjoy hunting. Responsible hunting means that you follow the laws and regulations of the local area.  If you don't, you not only will be levied with heavy fines, confiscation of your dive gear and any catch, you may also be arrested. You also effect the environment that we all want to preserve whether you hunt or not.

 

FAQs:

Season: Recreational lobster season opens at 12:00:01 AM on the Saturday preceding the first Wednesday of October and closes at 12:00:00 PM (midnight) on the first Wednesday after the 15th of March.

** Saturday, September 28, 2013 through Wednesday, March 19, 2014


How to Catch: take a California Lobster Hunter Specialty course.


Where do you find them: they can be shallow or deep or any where in between.  Lobsters move depending on the time of year, the weather and if they are molting.


What gear do I need to catch them: CA Fishing License and Lobster Report Card, lobster gauge, dive light(s), thick dive gloves and game bag and all the regular scuba gear.


How many can a diver catch: you may not land more than seven California spiny lobsters on any given day, and may not have more than seven in their possession at any time; this includes any at home in the freezer (bag and daily possession limit) According to Section 29.90(b) T14, CCR, the daily recreational bag limit is seven lobsters per person. Additionally, Section 1.17 states that no more than one daily bag limit may be taken or possessed by any one person unless otherwise authorized (see Declaration for Multi-Day Fishing Trip, Section 27.15 T14, CCR), regardless of whether they are fresh, frozen or otherwise preserved. This means that if you have a limit of seven lobsters at home, you cannot go out and get more lobsters until the first limit is disposed of in some way (eaten, given away, etc).


Did you know: The largest lobster recorded was caught off the coast of Nova Scotia, Canada, and weighed 44.4 lbs (20.14 kg); it was between 3 and 4 ft (0.9 to 1.2 m) long. Scientists think it was at least 100 years old.